WELCOME


~ The pieces are all sewn together, stitched with love.........and a quilt tells a story and the story is our past ~

The Arrowood family immigrated from England to Maryland in the 1700's. They went south, eventually settling in the mountains of North Carolina. Later , some went further south, into the Piedmont of North Carolina, in search of work and a better way of life.



I am in search of my family.

I search for those that came before me, and lived their lives as best they could. I am in search of their stories, how they lived, and how they loved.


I shared this love of seeking the past with my Dad, sharing each new finding with him, the thrill in his heart intermingling with mine. I continue this search in his honor, and hope to know these people of ours when I join up with them all in heaven.

~ Steve Lewis Arrowood 1932-2008 ~


Come with me, back to a simpler time and place. A place far removed from the hectic pace of today. To a time when life was hard, but the rewards were great. When your quality of life was determined by your own sweat, your own toil, and your own ingenuity.


Would you like a glass of sweet tea? Let's sit out on the porch where we will catch the sweetly scented breeze of summertime. Maybe Grandma will fry up some of her wonderful chicken... Time slows here.

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"We shape our lives not by what we carry with us, but what we leave behind."

~You live as long as you are remembered.~


"Our most treasured family heirlooms are our sweet family memories. " Author: Unknown


"But those who came before us will teach you. They will teach you from the wisdom of former generations."

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Arrowood Family

Sunday, December 11, 2011

Winters ~ Taylor's Chapel Cemetery, Buck Mountain, Avery County, NC


If you find that your heart needs a good dose of 'Christmas Spirit', just drive on up to the mountains and stand on a high knoll and breathe in very deeply, these days. They are cutting our North Carolina fir trees down and they are heading to the Christmas tree lots scattered about everywhere. The smell will fill your heart with 'mistletoe and holly' and you will be good to go. I sure was. Grin.


We made our way up to Avery County,  and every mile was building up more excitement in my heart.
Captivated by what I may find, I could hardly wait!


We located a tiny white chapel, located on what is called Buck Mountain.  It is sitting in a beautiful spot, banked by a stand of trees, alongside the ridge. There is an area surrounding Buck Mountain that is filled with fields of Christmas trees, as far as you can see.


The only sounds were the chirping of an occasional bird, and the sound of a far off chain saw as the tree cutters began their chore. The smell wafting up into that tiny church yard was unmistakable Christmas!



I wish I could place a scratch and sniff patch, right here for you to smell. Grin.

What were we doing up in Avery County, NC at a tiny church called Taylor's  Chapel?

Why we had come to visit our relatives, of course.
Almost all of those buried here, tie into our family tree somehow.


Buried here is Mary Jane Winters. She is the sister of our Sarah Ellen "Ellender" Winters, (older sister, by about two years). She married Andrew Jackson Franklin. Andrew was born in Watauga County, NC.

 I located Mary Jane's death record and she is buried here, but apparently, she has no marker standing. There are rows of field stones and square plain rock markers here in this tiny cemetery, centrally located,  and I feel sure one of those stones is hers. She is here, but her stone is lost in time.

Mary Jane and Andrew Franklin had eleven children, that I have found so far.

One son, Andrew Jackson Franklin, Jr., born fifth child of the eleven, on October 11, 1869, married a Mary Jane Potter in 1888 in Carter County, TN. That is where Roan Mountain is located, just over the line from Avery County, NC.

Andrew and Mary Jane went out west and settled in Utah.  Andrew began working in the coal mines and this is where his story sadly ends.

 Andrew Jackson Franklin was killed in an explosion of Winter Quarter #4, a coal mine, at Scofield, Utah on May 5, 1900.

This was a terrible blow, a calamity beyond all compare out on the frontier.

The survivors had no support , no insurance, no governmental assistance to help them,  at that time.

Widows were left  to raise large families and to somehow fend for themselves. Each deceased miner received a new suit of clothes (if he was intact) and a coffin.

Also each poor miner received a roughed out "R. I. P." style, wooden headstone with his name written in pencil.

Apparently over half the names on these makeshift markers were misspelled.

Each widow received $500.00 from the mine. Imagine the grief that was endured during that bleak moment in time.

Only four weeks later, the mine reopened,  with a fresh crew of miners.
Almost like nothing had happened at all.

Left behind was Andrew's widow, age 31, with six children all under the age of ten, with another son on the way. She must have been about five months pregnant with the last child.

Imagine how difficult a time she must have had.

One baby child died at birth, baby Alphonso. He is buried alongside his parents in Utah.
 
Here at Taylor's Chapel are Andrew's brothers and sisters:
Children of Mary Jane Winters and Andrew Franklin:
 
Elizabeth Franklin Turbyfill

Columburn F. "Lum" Franklin

Ella C. Franklin Turbyfill

Their other children, burial locations not yet located:

Louisa Franklin , Sarah Franklin

James T. Franklin, Carolina Franklin

John Edward Franklin and Malinda Franklin.
 
Also buried here are at least 27 Winters descendants. They are mostly the descendants of LuSynthia Winters, sister to our William "Billy Winters. She was the Aunt of Sarah Ellen Winters. Her eldest took the last name of Winters for some reason, so his descendants all have that last name. She remarried after being widowed and the rest of her children were Hicks.

It is truly a beautiful final resting place for our relatives,  here on Buck Mountain in Avery County, North Carolina.




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