WELCOME


~ The pieces are all sewn together, stitched with love.........and a quilt tells a story and the story is our past ~

The Arrowood family immigrated from England to Maryland in the 1700's. They went south, eventually settling in the mountains of North Carolina. Later , some went further south, into the Piedmont of North Carolina, in search of work and a better way of life.



I am in search of my family.

I search for those that came before me, and lived their lives as best they could. I am in search of their stories, how they lived, and how they loved.


I shared this love of seeking the past with my Dad, sharing each new finding with him, the thrill in his heart intermingling with mine. I continue this search in his honor, and hope to know these people of ours when I join up with them all in heaven.

~ Steve Lewis Arrowood 1932-2008 ~


Come with me, back to a simpler time and place. A place far removed from the hectic pace of today. To a time when life was hard, but the rewards were great. When your quality of life was determined by your own sweat, your own toil, and your own ingenuity.


Would you like a glass of sweet tea? Let's sit out on the porch where we will catch the sweetly scented breeze of summertime. Maybe Grandma will fry up some of her wonderful chicken... Time slows here.

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"We shape our lives not by what we carry with us, but what we leave behind."

~You live as long as you are remembered.~


"Our most treasured family heirlooms are our sweet family memories. " Author: Unknown


"But those who came before us will teach you. They will teach you from the wisdom of former generations."

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Arrowood Family

Sunday, October 11, 2009

The Ship Has Sailed ~ Arrowood’s Head For The Americas




The earliest mention of the family name in America that has been discovered was around 1658, when a William Arwood was among seventy seven people imported to Charles City County, VA, by a planter. The researcher who published abstracts of the court records listed him as "Wm Arwood [sic]," probably indicating that she suspected a misspelling of the name "Harwood."
The next Arwood came to King and Queen County, VA, around 1701, when Isaac Arwood was among four persons transported to a plantation in Pamunkey Neck, on the east side of Pampatike Sw "Pamunkey Neck" is the name of the region between the Pamunkey and Mattaponi Rivers, which merge to form the York River. Later in 1701, this area became King William County. It lies about thirty miles east of modern Richmond.
The name Isaac Arwood has not been discovered again in the next ninety years; then, around 1790, two Isaac Arrowoods were born in North Carolina.
Twenty eight years after Isaac arrived, another English Arwood emigrant was recorded. In October, 1729, one Mary Arwood was sentenced by a court in Middlesex County, England, to be transported to the colonies. In the same month, Mary boarded the ship "Forward", bound for Virginia; she died during the voyage. As the year is not too late, it must be considered that a baby or child might have survived her, although none was mentioned in the record.

Spelling variations include: Arrowood, Arwood, Arewood, Arowood, and others. First found in Lancashire where they were anciently seated at Arrowood.

Some of the first settlers of this name or some of its variants were: John, Isaac and Mary. The name was represented in many forms and recorded from the mid 17th century in the great migration from Europe. Migrants settled in the eastern seaboard from Newfoundland, to Maine, to Virginia, the Carolinas, and to the islands.

This first Arrowood, Immigrant Arrowood had two sons:

* Father (Of Maryland Arrowood , Born before 1720
* Johannah Arrowood, Born before 1720 in in Kent Island,
Queen Anne's County, MD

Father (Of Maryland) Arrowood had two sons.

**John Arrowood, (son of Father (of Maryland) Born before 1745

John Arwood was listed as a resident in the census report 1778 in Town Hundred, Talbot County, MD. He was listed as a resident in the census report 1790 in Queen Anne's County, MD. His name first is known from a tax list of 1768 in Rowan County, NC, when he was called John Arowod. The next appearance is as John Arewood on a census of Talbot County, Maryland, in 1778. In that same year, a John Arrowood Junior was named on a tax list in Rowan County, implying that an older man of that name was known to the recording clerk, but not necessarily indicating his immediate presence in the area.
The 1790 census found a John Arwood in Queen Anne County, Maryland (adjacent to Talbot County). Enumerated were three males over age 16 and five females. No boys under 16 were present.
It is not certain, though it seems likely, that the man in Talbot County in 1778 is the same as the man in adjacent Queen Anne County in 1790.
No other Ar--wood is known in Maryland after the Revolution. The two instances, and the spelling "Arewood" in 1778, argue against him being a dropped-"H" Harwood.
In the 1800 census, he was in Rowan County. He and his wife were both over age 45; there was a young man 16-25 (presumed to be Loyd) and a boy and girl, each 10-15. On the same page is his son John, age 26-45, with a wife 16-25 and children under 10. His son James was in Rutherford County with seven children, including two boys 10-15.
The information from that record supports the supposition that in 1790, John was in Talbot County, MD, with his two sons James and John. His wife and daughter, John's wife, and James's wife and possible daughter could have been the five females recorded there. Only the absence of John's son, age 10-15 in 1800, is unexplained. Perhaps he was born in 1790 after the census - he has not been identified.
Catastrophe, perhaps disease or accident, struck the family sometime before 1810. The aforementioned unidentified son, and John, his wife, and John Junior all disappeared from the records, and it appears that John Junior's widow and children were residing with Loyd in 1820.
John married and had four sons, his bride has yet to be ‘discovered’, as to her identity.

Their four sons were:


* John Arrowood, Jr. Born before 1774

In the 1800 Census, John was listed as a head of household in Rowan County, NC. He was age 26-44, residing with a woman 16-25 and a boy and a girl, both under age 10.


* Isaac (of TN ) Arrowood , Born about 1791

In the 1820 Census, Isaac was listed as a head of household in Lincoln County, NC. Isaac and his wife were age 26-44, with a girl 10-15, and two girls and a boy aged under 10. Isaac was a farmer. The census record is arranged alphabetically, apparently by militia companies. On separated lines within the same company are Eli, Ben, and Zachariah Arrowood.
In the 1830 Census, Isaac was listed as a head of household in Burke County, NC. Isaac and his wife were in their 30s, with two girls 10-14, two boys 5-9, and a boy and a girl each under 5.
In the 1840 Census, Isaac was listed as a head of household in Carter County, TN. Isaac was in his 30s, his wife was 40+. There was a boy 10-14, a girl 5-9, and a girl under age 5.
8/28/1850 census Carter County, TN, P221B L30, 9th Civ Dist:
Isaac Arowood 59 b. NC Collier col.12 col.10=1814; Susannah 60 b. NC col.12; Elijah W. b. TN Collier; Matilda C. 15 b. TN; Elinoir Robinson 20 b. NC col.10=1847; Eliza 1 b. TN. Next to William, near Hiram.
6/4/1860 census Washington County TN, P44B L31, Brush Creek Dist, Jonesboro:
Isaac Arrawood 70 b. NC Coalier PE$25; Elizabeth 70 b. NC; Carolina 27 b. NC Domestic.
8/13/1870 census Washington County, TN, P267B L6, District No. 9, Carter Station:
Arrowood Isaac 80 b. NC Farm laborer col.19; Caroline 40 b. NC Keeping house col.16,17.


* Lloyd Arrowood, Born 1792 in Lincoln County, North Carolina

In the 1810 Census, Loyd was listed as a head of household in Lincoln County, NC. He was recorded as of age 16-25, with two boys 10-15, two boys 0-9; a woman (wife?) 16-25, and two older women 26-44. These are presumed to include the widows and orphans of his father and brother.
In the 1820 Census, Loyd was listed as a head of household in Lincoln County, NC. Loyd was found with his wife, both age 26-44, and four boys and a girl, all under age 10.
In the 1830 Census, Loyd was listed as a head of household in Carter County, TN. Loyd and his wife were in their thirties and had added two boys and a girl age 5-9 and a boy and a girl under 5. Only one of the older boys and the girl, each 15-19, remained at home.
Loyd's name was on a tax roll 1836 in Johnson County, TN. Loyd and Drury Arrowood both appeared on the roll of District No. 7, taxed for one white poll and no land.
In the 1840 Census, Loyd was listed as a head of household in Carter County, TN. Loyd and his wife, now over 40, had added a boy and a girl, each age 5-9. Only the youngest girl from 1830 was no longer in the household. In all, it appears that he had as many as eight sons, of whom only four have been identified.

~ James T. (of Wilkes County NC) Arrowood ~ Born March 1, 1763
This is our James that married Eliza “Lisey” Crowder in 1765 in Rutherford County, North Carolina. * See his story in the posting, "The Arrowood Trail Begins~ James".





**James Arrowood, Born before 1740 in Queens Ann
County, Maryland





James Arrowood, son of Father (Of Maryland) Arrowood:

Sometime between 1732 and 1763, James Arrowood served for thirty days in Capt. Thomas Morris's Company of Maryland Militia. The most likely period would be early in the French and Indian War, or when he came of age during that war. Many of the names of the officers and soldiers on the roster of the militia appear in the land records of Frederick County, some as early as 1749. It appears that the company was organized from residents of Frederick County. James's service may have gained him a grant of land in the county, which he sold in the late 1760s, within five years after the end of the war.
Frederick Co. Circuit Court Records (LDS Film 13,938), Liber H, page 212, Nov. 18, 1762, records a deed from James Arrowood to Daniel Zacharias. On Aug. 31, 1765, James Irwood of Frederick County, signing with X his mark, deeded to John Baumgardner Jr. of Pipe Creek hundred in Frederick County, yeoman, for twenty two pounds and ten shillings, a fifty acre parcel of land called James' Choice lying in Pipe Creek hundred. The deed was witnessed by Wm Blair and Jas White. The indexer of deeds referred to this deed under both Irwood and Arwood.
No further mention of James Arrowood has been found in Maryland. On September 22, 1768, a petition for tax relief, signed with that name and twenty nine other residents of Orange and Rowan Counties in North Carolina, was sent to the Assembly of that colony.
In 1778, James Arrowood's name was mentioned as the original claimant of land claims entered by two others in Rowan County. On November 28 of that year, he entered his own claim of fifty acres in Rowan County on waters of Dutchmans and Pealor's Creeks; the border was a line between John Roberts and "his" father and his own lines. This land included John Roberts' improvements. Dutchmans Creek runs north west off of the north fork of the Yadkin River toward the north west corner of modern Rowan County, where it crosses into modern Surry County.



James (of Maryland) Arrowood, B. 1740 , had the following children:



~James William Arrowood~ Born about 1755, Maryland

James was in the Revolutionary War Battle at Kings Mountain in 1796.
In the 1800 Census, James was listed as a head of household in Rowan County, NC. James and his wife were both age 45+. There were two girls and a boy age 10-15, and two boys and two girls all under age 10. The author believes that this is the correct census entry for James William. The alternatives are James Arrowood in Rutherford County, who was age 26-44, and James Arrowood in the adjacent militia company of Rowan County, who the author believes was James of Maryland, listed adjacent (in the census which is arranged alphabetically by militia companies within the county) to his presumed son, Henry.
James served on a jury in July 1807 in Buncombe County, NC. In the 1810 Census, James was listed as a head of household in Buncombe County, NC. He was age 45+; his wife was 26-44. The household included two girls under age 10, a boy and a girl 10-15, and two young men and a woman each 16-25.
In the 1830 Census, James was listed as a head of household in Buncombe County, NC. James was in his 60s. In the household were a young woman in her 20s, a girl 15-19, a boy 5-9, and a girl under 5. No old woman was listed in any of the nearby households.
In the Census of 1840, James was listed as a head of household in Yancey County, NC. James and his wife were in their 60s, with a young woman in her 20s and a girl and a boy each under age 5.
In the Census of 1850, James was listed as a head of household in Buncombe County, NC. He was 95; Sarah was 91. Susannah, 47, was a resident in the household.
Although three sons have been attributed to him, it seems odd that none has been identified that was named after either grandfather.
In a note about his own family tree, Rev. John H. Ballard, a Free-Will Baptist minister, wrote, "James Arrowood was born in Pennsylvania and died in North Carolina at Paint Fork, Madison County, at age 100. His wife, ----- Bryant, lived to be 102 years old."
James Arrowood served in the Revolutionary War in the Battle of Monmouth and in the Southern regions under General Green and under Francis Marion and at the Battle of King's Mountain.
He owned quite a lot of land on Paint Fork where it joins into Little Ivy. He had a lot of rowdy boys and had to dispose of a lot of his land to get his boys out of trouble; therefore the family had very little before he and his wife died.
Their daughter, Sarah Sallie Arrowood, married Joseph Ballard in Reems Creek Valley, Buncombe County, NC.
James's age may have been exaggerated in his later years. No census between 1800 and 1850 gives any indication that he was born prior to 1760.
James married Sarah Bryan and they had six children.




~ John Hensley Arrowood ~ Born March 1, 1763

In the summer of 1776, in Rowan County, NC, he entered Captain Elijah Lyons' Company and marched with Colonel Locke's Regiment in General Rutherford's expedition against the Cherokee.
In the 1790 Census, John was listed as a head of household in Morgan District, Lincoln County, NC. In his household were two women, presumably wife and daughter, and two boys under 16.
Some time in the mid-1790s he moved from Lincoln County to the adjacent Spartanburg District of South Carolina, just across the state line.
In the 1800 Census, John was listed as a head of household in Spartanburg District, SC. He was age 26-44, with a wife of the same age group, a daughter under 10, and one son in each range 0-9, 10-15, and 16+.
An abstract from Spartanburg District, SC, Deed Book I, p.470-1, August 4, 1800 mentions John Lee's land on waters of Pacolate River and Broad River bordering John Arrowood's land on one side and the North Carolina border on another side.
In the 1810 Census, John was listed as a head of household in Burke County, NC. He and his wife were over age 45, with a young man age 16-25 and two boys under 10. He had left his son James with the land in South Carolina.
In the 1820 Census, John was listed as a head of household in Burke County, NC. He and his wife were residing with a young man of 16-25 and two boys under 10. Probably this was his son John, who evidently lost his wife at an early age.
In 1832, residing in Burke County, he applied for a pension. Supporting testimony was given by his brother, Zacheriah. In 1833 he was granted $25 to be paid twice a year, plus $100 arrears for the prior two years.
John filed pension in Burke County, NC at age 65. In 1935 Newspaper article Daily Times; Fanny Arwood stated her Grandfather, Hensley, had fought in the Revolutionary War.


~ Nathaniel Arrowood ~ Born about 1764

The only known reference to this man by name is as a witness to the will of Peter Hammonds, written in Rowan County on March 1, 1788. He could be the other adult male enumerated with Zacariah in the 1790 census, or he could have gone back to Maryland, and the enumerate was another of Zachariah's brothers. It seems most likely that he was the deceased husband of Ann Arrowood, who was in Rowan County in 1790 with a young boy and two women or girls. If he were son of James of Maryland, it's likely that his first son would be called James.


~Benjamin Arrowood ~ Born about 1765


In the 1790 Census, Benjamin was listed as a head of household in Salisbury Dist, Rowan County, NC. He was living with a woman and no children, in the Salisbury District.
In the 1800 Census, Benjamin was listed as a head of household in Lincoln County, NC. He and his wife, each age 26-44, were living with a boy under age 9 and a girl 10-15.
In the 1810 Census, Benjamin was listed as a head of household in Lincoln County, NC. He was over 45 years of age, his wife was 26-44, and his boy was 10-15.
In the 1820 Census, Benjamin was listed as a head of household in Lincoln County, NC. He and his wife, both over age 45, were living with a young man and woman, both age 16-25, who may be presumed to have been his son Benjamin and wife. The census record is arranged alphabetically, apparently by militia companies. On separated lines within the same company are Eli, Isaac, and Zachariah Arrowood.





~ Zachariah Arrowood ~ Born about 1768

In an affidavit given on May 25, 1833, in support of his brother John's application for a Revolutionary War soldier's pension, Zachariah gave his own age as 65. He recalled that he was old enough before the war ended to be placed on the muster roll. Zacariah remembered seeing his brother march off with Captain Lyons to join General Rutherford's expedition. He said that John later had moved to Lincoln County, where he was reported to have volunteered again, but that he, Zachariah, had not gone to Lincoln County until after the war.
In 1790 in the census Zachariah was listed as residing in Morgan District, Lincoln County, NC. In the early years of the 1800s, Zachariah Arrowood was granted land in the Spartanburgh District of South Carolina, which lay just across the border from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in North Carolina. This land, on Buck Creek of the Pacolate River, was near other land owned by a John Arrowood, who may be presumed to have been Zachariah's brother. It appears that all of Zachariah's grant in South Carolina had been sold before 1810.
In the 1810 Census, Zachariah was listed as a head of household in Buncombe County, NC. Zachariah was over age 45; his wife was 26-44, born after 1765 and before 1785. There was one boy each of age 16-25 and 10-15, and two boys and two girls all under age 10.
Thirty years after the Revolution, the War of 1812 gave Zachariah his chance to fight the British. On April 21, 1814, he was enlisted at Rutherford for a term of five years by a Lt. Alexander into the 10th U.S. Infantry Regiment, commanded by Col. Wellborn. Two enlistment records survive: one gave his age as 40 and his birthplace as Lincoln County, NC; the other said he was 51, born in Frederick County, Maryland. He was described as six feet one half (or one and one half) inches tall, with black hair and eyes and a dark complexion, occupation: farmer.
He was listed on a roster at Wilkesborough on May 31, 1814. The duty roster of Capt. E.J. Leigh's Company reported him present February. 16, 1815. A medical roster of Capt. James Reed's Company of U.S. Artillery at Fort Washington on April 30, 1815, had him absent sick at Fredericksburg. Another medical report and invalid report of Capt. H.H. Vallard's Detachment at Fort Washington on July 31, 1815 listed him as "present unfit for service."
His enlistment record mentions a discharge dated Inspector's Office, 4th Military Department, Aug. 26, 1815, and records "Book 563, Lt. Alexander's Co. 10th U.S. Infy, Discharged, Aug. 26, 1815, Rheumatism contracted previous to enlistment." Further, it reports a "Roll dated 1815, Capt. Robt G. Hite's Co. U.S. Arty, Discharged, Sept. 8, 1815, by order Col. Mitchell, -10th U.S. Infy made Arty- Discharged from Capt. E.J. Leigh's Co. 10th Infy at Washington, September 13, 1815. Rheumatism." The enlistment record ends with a note, "See Pension Case." However, Zachariah doesn't appear in the published index of War of 1812 pension applicants.
In the 1820 Census, Zachariah was listed as a head of household in Lincoln County, NC. He was over 45; his wife was age 26-44, born after 1775 and before 1795. There was a boy 18-26, a boy 16-17, a girl 10-15, and three girls and a boy all under 10. The census record is arranged alphabetically, apparently by militia companies. On separated lines within the same company are Eli, Isaac, and Ben Arrowood.
In the 1830 Census, Zachariah was listed as a head of household in Burke County, NC. Zachariah was in his 60s, while his wife was in her 40s. In the household there were a girl 15-19, two girls 10-14, a boy and a girl each 5-9, and two boys and a girl all under age 5. The adjacent line of the census listed his son, Zachariah, age 30-39.


~ Henry Arrowood~ Born about 1769

In the 1800 Census, Henry was listed as a head of household in Rowan County, NC. He was age 26-44 and his wife was 16-25. In the household were a girl 10-15, and two girls and a boy all under age 10. He was listed as a neighbor of James Arrowood of Maryland.

~Ann Arrowood~ Born about 1770

Ann applied for a marriage license to wed William James December 2, 1784 in Lincoln County, NC.
Internet correspondent John Coates said that they resided in the old Rowan County, NC area from the 1770s to the 1830s, in the part has since become Wilkes, Burke, and Alexander Counties. Ann is not positively linked to this family, but most believe she belongs.

2 comments:

  1. What a wonderful page. I'm helping with researching my cousin's (by marriage) family. Her grandmother is Nancy Arrowood 1878-1945, Daughter of Ester J Spicer and John Francis Arrowood 1850-1906.

    This is such a rich history of the Arrowood family and I know she will be thrilled with the information you have here. Thank you so much for all your work.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hello there~
    Nice to have you "visit" with me awhile.
    According to my records, your cousin's grandmother, Nancy Ann Arrowood Cornett, is my Half Third Cousin, Twice Removed..Quite something to wrap your thoughts around, grin.

    Would you know where John Francis is buried?
    Thanks for you comments, I really appreciate it!
    I enjoy the search very much.
    Good Luck on finding what you seek.

    ReplyDelete